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Wednesday
July 01, 2009

 

A guide to developing school-to-community partnerships

Every month Golden Apple Fellows provide free professional development resources for teachers on the Golden Apple website. This month, Jim Arey shares a guide to developing school-to-community partnerships for high school students. The Guide is intended to assist social science and occupational teachers in the areas of public service and its related occupations to develop, create, and operate an internship program. This approach creates interaction among instructors and encourages the interchange of ideas and sharing of resources. The guide is designed for use in all schools in rural, suburban, or urban settings. binary broker review

Click here to find out more and download the guide.

Jim Arey, a 2001 Golden Apple Fellow, is a social studies teacher at Elk Grove High School, in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. For eleven years, Jim was teacher and coordinator of the Public Service Practicum Community Resource program. The Public Service Practicum combines academics with real life learning in the form of non-paid internships, field experiences, and volunteer community service. Jim is a recipient of multiple awards and recognitions including the Golden Apple Award. He has encouraged his students to apply for and earn over $1 million dollars in college grants and scholarships. Jim has assisted in a multitude of community fundraising efforts including the Soldier Memorial fund, Heart of a Marine Foundation, and Community Character Coalition of Elk Grove.


Thursday
June 04, 2009

 

Resources for bringing technology into your classroom

Every month Golden Apple Fellows provide free professional development resources for teachers on the Golden Apple website. This month, 2008 Fellow Carol Broos shares her wide wealth of resources for bringing technology into all classrooms. Carol explains, “When teachers explore the Internet through educational links, they can connect with each other and discover a Web 2.0 how to withdraw from binary.com world that will enhance their teaching and increase their students’ knowledge of 21st century skills.”

“Let’s Communicate”: Resources for all teachers”
This presentation outline gives an overview of a wide range of online tools that teachers can use. Tips for online communication, interesting videos, links to the best sites for blogging, and much more.

MIDI Lab: Resources for music teachers”
This flyer outlines the process of setting up a high-tech music lab and describes the evolution of the music lab over a five-year period, along with helpful resources for starting your own lab.  A companion website give an overview of Carol’s music technology curriculum and many more resources.

Click here to find all the free resources from Golden Apple Fellows

Carol Broos is a 2008 Fellow and a born teacher. She has been teaching 4th-8th grade music at Sunset Ridge School in Northfield, Illinois for over twenty years. Her website www.carolbroos.com has won national awards; her blog www.beatechie.com is one of the top 100 Music Education blogs. She frequently presents at state and national conventions both in technology and music. She is a 2006 Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher, a Finalist in TechLearning’s 2007 Leader of the Year, the 2008 IL Music Teacher of the Year, a 2008 Google Teacher Academy, and a 2009 Apple Distinguished Educator.


Tuesday
April 28, 2009

 

A guide to getting published

This month’s free professional development resource from Golden Apple is a step-by-step guide to getting your words—and your students’—into print. It was provided by 1997 Golden Apple Fellow and published children’s book author Cheryl Chapman. Please visit the Golden Apple website to download your copy!

A note from Cheryl:

When I was working as a Head Start teacher in the early 1980’s, I was frustrated with the lack of diverse characters in the picture books in my classroom.  I’d been a writer all of my life, heading up The Scribblers Club as a Roosevelt High School student in Des Moines, Iowa, and writing poetry for friends and magazines, editorials for newspapers, liturgies for church, and plays for various organizations.  I admit it:  I always knew I could write for kids, but took that talent for granted.  I was the geek who was so thrilled whenever we were assigned 500-word essays in grade school.  I entertained my little brothers and sisters and their friends with my Dr. Seuss take-offs.  When Kennedy died, I wrote a poem that made my whole school start to cry again.  I knew the power of playing with words.  So, along with my hippie-era penchant for righting wrongs, as well as my civil rights work, my little 3 and 4 year- old Head Start students finally gave me the motivation for getting some stories out of my heart and into publication.  Around that time, our local NAACP president befriended me.  I think it no coincidence that Cynthia Davis Brown was also a retired 3rd grade Chicago Public School teacher.  She took me, like a student, like a daughter, under her wings and saw that I developed the faith and know-how to do more than simply self-publish my manuscripts.  She has been the angel at my shoulder ever since, and I hope she’s proud.

So, that’s how I got here! No matter how you’ve come to the writing life, and no matter how your students get there, if you’ve never tried to get something published before, these pages should help you!  You will learn the basics:

  • How to assemble your story
  • How to find a publisher
  • How to submit work to a publisher
  • What to do in the meantime with your thirty gazillion unpublished works
  • How to enable your students’ writing addictions as well!

Thursday
April 09, 2009

 

Latest trends in education, part 4

Please enjoy posts from Golden Apple’s own Penny Lundquist for the next few weeks.  Penny is a 1986 Golden Apple Fellow. She has been on the staff of Golden Apple for 17 years, and currently serves as Golden Apple’s Director of Professional Development. Prior to working at Golden Apple, she was an English teacher with 23 years of classroom experience in grades five through twelve. Her interests include literacy and teacher professionalism.

What follows is a highly personal list of what I perceive to be 5 key education trends . . . expressed as injunctions.  I would love to have readers comment on my choices and list picks of their own.  These are in no particular order, just things I’m picking up surfing the internet, reading Educational Leadership, Edutopia and other education publications, and following Obama’s/Duncan’s education priorities. 

Today is the 5th and final trend in this series.

5.  Start young and focus on reading. 
President Obama and Secretary Duncan have placed a high priority on early childhood education as the key to improving student achievement.  High quality, universal early childhood education can generate a generation of children entering elementary school ready to read and to learn.  The early years are critical in laying the groundwork for developing literacy, which leads to success in school, graduation from high school, entry into higher education and success in securing jobs demanding intellectual capital.  Reading is Everybody’s Business!!  This is something we’ve seen illustrated recently as Secretary Duncan and the Obamas have gone public reading to children.  Whatever else is or isn’t done educationally, reading is the basis for learning how to learn, the bedrock of education.  Deep in our national DNA is the image of Abraham Lincoln, our 16th president, largely self-taught, trudging miles to get library books and reading by candlelight… binary. com broker

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Monday
April 06, 2009

 

Latest trends in education, part 3

Please enjoy posts from Golden Apple’s own Penny Lundquist for the next few weeks.  Penny is a 1986 Golden Apple Fellow. She has been on the staff of Golden Apple for 17 years, and currently serves as Golden Apple’s Director of Professional Development. Prior to working at Golden Apple, she was an English teacher with 23 years of classroom experience in grades five through twelve. Her interests include literacy and teacher professionalism.

What follows is a highly personal list of what I perceive to be 5 key education trends . . . expressed as injunctions.  I would love to have readers comment on my choices and list picks of their own.  These are in no particular order, just things I’m picking up surfing the internet, reading Educational Leadership, Edutopia and other education publications, and following Obama’s/Duncan’s education priorities. 

Last week, I looked at three trends in education. This week, I’ll be sharing two more. Today, #4:

4.  The digital divides need closing. 
Definitely one of the most urgent priorities is to guarantee that students acquire the 21st century technological skills they will need to compete successfully with students in other countries for the high quality lifestyles and living wages that are in everyone’s best interest.  For that to happen, two digital divides need closing.  We all know about the first – ensuring that poor kids have the same access to technology that more advantaged kids have.  That’s the original digital divide and by all accounts it is widening rather than shrinking.  And that brings us to the second:  in many high poverty schools, computers and other high tech equipment sit gathering dust, in some cases still in their original boxes, because teachers are either technology averse, haven’t received adequate professional development to use the technology or our current priorities under NCLB seem to preclude more innovative instructional approaches – those involving technology.  There is a digital divide between kids and their teachers across socio-economic groups.  It’s just less problematic in more advantaged communities where kids have access to technology after school, when much of their real learning is taking place, driven by their own interests.  All teachers need to become more sophisticated users of technology for instruction.  That means they need to understand how to harness web 2.0 features for classrooms across the nation.

For more, check out Edutopia.

Check back in a few days for the 5th and final trend in this series!


 
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